EDGEBANDING

The process through which the edges of panels are finished. The process involves applying a plastic edge, usually made out of ABS as well as PP or PVC, to a panel by successive steps including adhesion, trimming and finishing. Conventional edgebanding uses hot-melt adhesives. Recently developed glue-free technologies use a suitable active layer on the back side of the edge, which is then fused together using a laser, hot air or infrared and becomes the adhesive for the panel.

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FOLDING

This literally means folding. Manufacturing process for three-dimensional part-finished products, where the back of a panel is scored using V-shaped cutters to form grooves along which the panel is then folded, similar to the way in which cardboard boxes are made. This process enables you to simulate thick-er panels or to produce low-weight box beams.

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MICROFOLDING

Evolution of the preforming process in which, through angling cutters in a specific way, you obtain a joint that enables you to get very small radii.

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POSTFORMING

Edge coating process in which the pre-shaped rough board has already been coated on the flat surface using flat lamination (see flat lamination) leaving a part of the coating protruding, which is then shaped and glued onto the edge using heat and rubber rollers.

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SIZING

Process of cutting a panel to the requested measurements. It is carried out using various machines, from manual saws to highly productive automatic saws. Depending on the order, panels are cut according to a cutting pattern that minimises waste.

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DRILLING AND MILLING

Custom drilling is completed on part-finished products using numerically controlled machines. The holes will then be home to hardware such as handles, hinges or plugs for shelves etc.
Milling is a process for removing material that enables the production of a wide range of surfaces (floors, grooves, shoulders, etc.) using a multicutting tool with defined angles.

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HONEYCOMB

Wooden core-based panel, composed of a central two-section core joined together through adhesion and hot pressing. The frame is made out of wood, usually spruce, and it is filled with an alveolar (honeycomb) structure made out of cardboard or aluminium, or by a lattice of strips of plywood. The two sides are usually formed of wood-based panels or sheets of plastic laminate. From a technical point of view, honeycomb panels are the best solution for obtaining structural elements that are both light and mechanically strong.

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